Save our NHS, but how?

Panacea comment for Financial Advisers and Paraplanners

5 Dec 2016

Save our NHS, but how?

I had a very interesting discussion over the weekend with a Labour party activist, campaigning under a specially erected party tent in the centre of my hometown, Wokingham.

I was asked if I would sign a petition to support more funding for the NHS and a very interesting discussion ensued.

The female activist was a bit younger than me and was a teacher. She was passionate about the NHS and was of the view that the NHS needed so much more money.

I agree, but having seen in my 65 years how the NHS has evolved, something, in fact most things with the NHS and its management and funding is seriously broken.

The NHS was launched on July 5th 1948 by the then Labour health minister Aneurin Bevan It was based on three core principles:

  • that it meet the needs of everyone
  • that it be free at the point of delivery
  • that it be based on clinical need, not ability to pay

Please note these, and especially those words in the last one around clinical need and the ability to pay.

To most a visit to your GP, a ride in an ambulance to A&E and the ensuing care after an accident or sudden serious illness are rightly considered to be FOC, funded by our taxes.

But we live in a very different world to that of 1948. Health service provisions are more sophisticated, peoples health needs have become very jentitlement based indeed and as a result are far more expensive.

For example, in 1948, the following were not available treatments on the NHS:

  • Heart and lung transplants
  • Liver and kidney transplants
  • Gender re-assignment
  • IVF
  • Womb transplants
  • Breast enhancement and reduction
  • Tattoo removal
  • Critical illness busting treatments such as cancer
  • HIV prevention
  • Intelligent prosthetics

Whilst many in the UK would cling to the 1948 core principles, the fiscal fuel for delivery of healthcare requires a charging rethink, especially as so much of the NHS service delivery in 2016 is driven more by a clinical want than a clinical need.

Not everything is free anymore in the NHS. With some exceptions we pay for dental care starting at £19.70 prescriptions starting at £8.40 and eye care, excluding contact lenses.

Surely the time has come to apply notional charges for GP visits and non-emergency NHS services that are not currently subject to charges in line with the dental model.

But will politicians be brave enough to change the funding model from all taxation to an element of pay on delivery?

Just a thought

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