How much has the shiny new logo cost this time?

Panacea comment for Financial Advisers and Paraplanners

9 May 2017

How much has the shiny new logo cost this time?

In 2013, a Panacea FOI request exposed the rebrand cost for the FSA’s change to the FCA.

It was  £1,061,423 including VAT.

The FOI request went on to confirm the cost of the logo design saying:

“We have spent £48,000 on designing the FCA brand identity, £91,500 on developing the FCA brand guidelines, £57,000 on registering the new logo and on legal fees to resolve registration issues”.

So when we heard that the FCA had decided, after a shelf life of barely three years, to change it’s logo, we though it would be an idea to find out how much?

In their reply, an unnamed individual from the “Information Disclosure Team / Cyber and Information Resilience Department” said We undertook a refresh of the FCA brand to make sure our brand is accessible, open and transparent so that all our audiences understand our role.  In particular, we need to ensure our brand works well for digital use and takes into account accessibility considerations.  This is particularly important as we are planning to launch our first national TV and outdoor advertising campaign on PPI later this year. Consumer research in particular has helped inform our evolution of the FCA logo to ensure ‘Financial Conduct Authority’ is clearly legible and accessible”.

Given that in 2013 so much was spent on rebrand one might ask, purely from a business owner perspective, why the lifespan of a ‘global’ brand is just 3 years? That would suggest that either the brand brief or interpretation was incorrect in 2013.

The reply to our request was answered as follows.

          “Brand refresh 

·         The design cost:

£5,340

·         Legal costs:

£1,440

·         Implementation cost;

£66,410 – we have interpreted this to be the total cost (including the items above) – agency work to audit FCA brand and update logo and design approach, design templates for new brand, effra fonts and logo trademark registration.

·        Stationery cost”

There are currently no stationery costs. As stated above, the existing logo will be phased out over the next year and we will not change signage in our printed material such as letterheads or business cards until either they run out or we change address. 

Over the last 10 years the Panacea brand logo is unchanged, as is the Ford Motor Company’s, Apple and Coca Cola. In 2014, the Coca-Cola brand name alone was worth $67million, accounting for more than 54% of the company’s stock market value at that time.

It is said, a strong, consistent brand will allow the customer to know exactly what to expect each time they encounter your business” 

Steve Jobs said, “Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works”.

In this case, the jury on the ‘how the FCA’s works’ is still out.

The cost of this exercise is quite small in regulatory terms. I am not sure what the effect is on consumers but I am sure that those it regulates will see this as another example of spending other peoples money without being responsible for how or if it works or in this case if you can notice the difference at all.

Can you spot the differences?

We had to destroy Ben Tre in order to save it

Panacea comment for Advisers and Paraplanners

24 Apr 2017

We had to destroy Ben Tre in order to save it

For those not old enough to know too much about the U.S. involvement in the 1960’s Vietnam war, and some of the madness surrounding it, this quote has gone down in history as an example of the some of the insanity that was Vietnam.

As with many examples of madness in what should be a sane world, this quote, which I was reminded of recently, is well worth considering alongside. It is Callum McCarthy’s six pillars of wisdom speech at Gleneagles in September 2006.

The so-called pillars on which RDR was to be founded were:


1.    an industry that engages with consumers in a way that delivers more clarity for them on products and services;

2.    a market which allows more consumers to have their needs and wants addressed;

3.    remuneration arrangements that allow competitive forces to work in favour of consumers;

4.    standards of professionalism that inspire consumer confidence and build trust;

5.    an industry where firms are sufficiently viable to deliver on their longer-term commitments and where they treat their customers fairly; 

6.    a regulatory framework that can support delivery of all of these aspirations and which does not inhibit future innovation where this benefits consumers. 

The Heath Report Two (THR2) had been created to examine the consumer detriment caused by the regulator’s actions in introducing the Retail Distribution Review.

The Heath Report Three (THR3) will be published toward the end of May.

As Garry said “It did not seek to be a learned academic document but to assemble in one place a clear description of what RDR has created and suggest lessons that might learnt”. 

In April 2014; the Panacea Team, Lee Travis, now at PFS and Garry Heath met the with the FCA which dismissed the survey of 1,752 advisers, representing over 50% of the direct authorised IFA firms, as “unimportant

At that April meeting, the FCA informed us that it would issue an internal review early in the autumn which we expected to be in praise of RDR.

In the end, the FCA commissioned European Consulting and Towers Watson to produce and issue two lacklustre reports, which were quietly released in the week before Christmas to a distracted media – hardly the action of a confident regulator.

These reports suggested that there was “no evidence of consumer benefit” leaving the FCA to opine that RDR’s “longer journey will benefit consumers”.

As Garry observed, this is reminiscent of Mr Micawber’s hope “that something will turn up”.

With the advisory community barely having the capacity to service some 10% of UK consumers financial planning needs and with the remaining 90% who do not want or cannot afford to pay for financial advice, we seem to be in a similar situation to the one described by Captain Miller’s, US Army Corps of Engineers  Commander, Task Force Builder, 1968  46th Engineer Battalion  159th Engineer Group ,recollection of Major Booris’s reasoning for destroying a whole village with so much firepower.

In the case of RDR only one of the six pillars stands, number 4. And as we all know you cannot build any sustainable structure on just one pillar. It just falls down. The regulator has ensured that the other five cannot be built as the ground beneath it has been destroyed by too much regulator firepower.

In the Vietnam movie ‘Apocalypse Now’, Captain Willard, played by Martin Sheen, asks a seasoned vet while riding a helicopter over enemy terrain “why do you guys sit on your helmets”?

The answer could be the same reason why IFAs only have a 10% capacity for advice?