How much is that doggie in the window?

Panacea comment for Financial Advisers and Paraplanners

26 Feb 2018

How much is that doggie in the window?

This HMRC document hit my desk last week. What a great idea, it shows how your ‘hard earned’ is spent by the state on your behalf.

Out of a tax take of £19,302 the welfare spend is more that the amount taken for servicing the national debt, education and defence combined. And they are the 4th, 5th and 6th highest spends.

Welfare accounts in this case for almost 25% of this total tax gathering for 2016/17.

I used to hear a lot about hard pressed families in the lead up to the last couple of elections and I think there was a strong political point to make, but the point set the wrong thought processes off.

If this taxpayer is anything to go by, those hard-pressed families could be in such a situation because 25% of each taxable element of their working day is spent on providing welfare of some sort to recipients various and unknown.

Perhaps in the brave new world of disclosure, this document should give a breakdown subset of how this money is spent, where it is spent, who spends it and on what exactly.

There are some other very interesting perspectives thrown up in this document. The last in particular around the UK contribution to the EU budget. It is just £135, some 0.7% of the total bill.

I was/am very keen to see Brexit actually happen. I doubt it ever will.

But instead of sending buses around the country with messages on the side illustrating how much could be made available to add to the £3,918 from this tax bill on the NHS in the run up to the referendum, voting may have been somewhat different if the amount each taxpayer actually contributed to the EU was set out just like this.

I await another statement for 2017/18 that I assume will show how much has actually been spent from this income tax breakdown on Brexit?

Sadly I fear we will never know.

 

Advertisements

Stinking badges 3

Panacea comment for Financial Advisers and Paraplanners

23 Feb 2018

Stinking badges 3

For those of you who remember the Mel Brooks classic ‘Blazing Saddles,’ the town of Rock Ridge was being held to ransom by out of control Mexican bandits who proudly proclaim to the Mayor, Hedley Lamarr, that in a town with no sheriff, to cause havoc they “don’t need no stinking badges”.

So fast forward to the 21st Century where Rock Ridge is now ‘policed’ by the new bandits in town- Claims Management Companies (CMC’s)

Wheels turn slowly, but those who recall our campaign, with Alan Lakey, on the regulation of CMC’s will note some very positive ‘outcomes’ after a number of meetings with Kevin Rousell, Head of Claims Management Regulation Unit at the Ministry of Justice.

Kevin recently let me know that the House of Commons was working on the FINANCIAL GUIDANCE AND CLAIMS BILL [LORDS] Public Bill Committee: 25 January 2018.

In ‘Blazing Saddles’ parlance, Bart has just ridden into town.

There is an amendment which inserts a provision into the upcoming Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations which prohibits live unsolicited telephone calls for the purposes of direct marketing in relation to claims management services except where the person called has given prior consent to receiving such calls.

Do read the whole bill but in particular section N6 which states:

Financial Guidance and Claims Bill-[Lords], continued

After regulation 21 insert—

“21A Calls for direct marketing of claims management services

  1. (1)  A person must not use, or instigate the use of, a public electronic communications service to make unsolicited calls for the purposes of direct marketing in relation to claims management services except in the circumstances referred to in paragraph (2).
  2. (2)  Those circumstances are where the called line is that of a subscriber who has previously notified the caller that for the time being the subscriber consents to such calls being made by, or at the instigation of, the caller on that line.
  3. (3)  A subscriber must not permit the subscriber’s line to be used in contravention of paragraph (1).
  4. (4)  In this regulation, “claims management services” means the following services in relation to the making of a claim—
    1. (a)  advice;
    2. (b)  financial services or assistance;
    3. (c)  acting on behalf of, or representing, a person;
    4. (d)  the referral or introduction of one person to another;
    5. (e)  the making of inquiries.
  5. (5)  In paragraph (4), “claim” means a claim for compensation, restitution, repayment or any other remedy or relief in respect of loss or damage or in respect of an obligation, whether the claim is made or could be made—

(a) by way of legal proceedings,

(b) in accordance with a scheme of regulation (whether voluntary or compulsory), or

(c) in pursuance of a voluntary undertaking.”

Readers may wish to refer to “Stinking badges 2” from August 2016.

It is well documented how claims management companies have plagued this industry in recent years.  Many of these have lied, cheated, deceived and generally operated in a base and underhand manner.

Alan noted “The Ministry of Justice unit at Burton on Trent had been unable to deal with the excesses in a sensible manner and when foul behaviour has been determined the response is often the equivalent of a slapped wrist and a bad telling off. 

Hopefully this bill will sound the death knell at long last for this legally assisted parasite that feeds off the world of financial services.