Boring is as boring does

Panacea comment for Financial Advisers and Paraplanners

5 Sep 2016

Boring is as boring does

I recently had through my door a local magazine, you know, the type that has all sorts of information in a semi glossy, very thin A4 format about local ‘stuff and people’ that these days the internet is the ‘go to’ to find out about.

I do not know why but my wife started to flick through some of its pages before consigning it to the bin as she usually does.

A few pages in she came across an ‘advertorial’ piece from a local IFA. What drew her attention in particular to this was that the IFA in question used to work for me in his first steps toward becoming an IFA.

What attracted me to him was his personality, his enthusiasm and ideas. And above all a desire to make a difference.

But what has happened to this ‘bright young thing’ some 15 years later?

The editorial was, in her opinion, boring, lifeless, colourless and totally bereft of any encouragement to speak to him or his firm about financial advice or becoming a client.

In financial services today, to attract new clients to new businesses, or in fact any business, great marketing is essential. It should be with a digital focus and should be aimed at engaging with the client audience you are trying to attract. It should make a statement about your firm, what makes you different, what you are experts at and why they should choose your firm.

The UK finance sector was the second biggest spender online, accounting for 13.4% of total adspend (IAB/PwC adspend survey H1 2015).

In the USA, total digital advertising spend for 2015 saw rapid growth, reaching $58B. US mobile devices surpassed desktop in share of digital ad spend, accounting for 52% of the total.

The finance sector was one of the earliest adopters of Internet advertising, quick to see its exceptional accountability and numerous opportunities to build brands online.

Display, search advertising, social media, affiliate marketing and behavioral targeting are just some of the methods which key players in the sector can use to reach their audiences in an effective and engaging way.

The reason for so much mobile device engagement is due to the general mobile accessibility for consumers in their downtime- travelling, waiting, lunch breaks and of course the fact that today so many firms block private internet browsing in the office.

There are some brilliant examples out there of advisers grasping the digital way forward using video, blogs, and social media channels.

So go digital, bin the boring and engage with the opportunity the 21st century makes possible.

As Steve Jobs said Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it’s really how it works”

And when it works, it works very well.

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fca attempts to regulate the internet

The FCA has produced a consultation paper regarding its intent to impose rules on firms use of social media and customer communications. It is an interesting, and as usual dry, slightly confusing and condescending read.

Ahead of the curve, in June 2014, Panacea Adviser produced a free guide to Using Social Media Successfully, which also included direction from a compliance perspective and vitally, it was very easy to understand. A copy has been forwarded to the FCA. You can download a copy too.

The FCA paper could be summed up in the style of my end of term school reports that used to read “could try harder”“seems to have trouble grasping the subject” or “lacks perspective in key areas”.

I shudder to think what this venture into cyberspace has cost so far, let alone what it will cost.

We exchanged a few tweets with them on the matter, the thing with tweets is that they are there to allow some thought exchanges, ‘Tweeter etiquette’ dictates you should always respond as that helps with understandings.

Here is the only one they responded to:

TheFCA

: Being a follower of a firm on Twitter or liking a firm’s FB page doesn’t constitute ‘an established existing client relationship’ #smfca

11:35am, Aug 06 from Twitter Web Client

PanaceaAdviser

: @TheFCA net neutrality rules were also designed to allow the freedom to innovate without permission, a bit of a minefield you are creating?

11:55am, Aug 06 from Hootsuite

TheFCA

: @PanaceaAdviser we’re keen not to prevent innovation but need to make sure all financial promotions are compliant

3:23pm, Aug 06 from Twitter Web Client

Clive Adamson the FCA Director of Supervision (yes that Clive Adamson) said, “The FCA sees positive benefits from using social media but there has to be an element of compliance.

But what is an element of compliance? With a regulator there is no known measure or metric for ‘element’ until after the event.

Section 2 of their paper regarding the FCA supervisory approach starts with a definition of what are (not is) social media and has chosen a non-social media source as its reference point- the Oxford Dictionary 2013. “Social media share the characteristic of being digital and can be defined as ‘websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or participate in social networking”

Now if we were to use the more web relevant on-line source Wikipedia, the definition of Social media is “the social interaction among people in which they create, share or exchange information and ideas in virtual communitiesand networks”.

Wikipedia goes on to say that “Social media differs from traditional or industrial media in many ways, including quality, reach frequency, usability, immediacy, and permanence”.

The FCA produced a “non-exhaustive” list of social media classifications to include blogs, micro blogs (Twitter), social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn etc) forums and image or video sharing platforms like YouTube.

Wikipedia covers off the above too, but a little more richly noting that social network aggregation can integrate many of the platforms in use.

They go on to observe that “the boundaries between the different types have become increasingly blurred arguing that Twitter, as a combination of broadcasting service and social network, now classes as a “social broadcasting technology“.

The paper seems to ignore the various forms of social media and technology engagement habits of users. It makes no mention of business potential from managing and harvesting data from social media or ‘building social authority’ aka ‘vanity building’.

Clive Adamson went on to say, “We have had extensive industry engagement on this issue and we believe our guidance is a sensible approach that doesn’t affect industry’s ability to innovate using new forms of media”.

Having been told by a number of influential financial services ’Tweeters’ (identified from our recent ‘Top Tweeter’ awards winners)  that they had not been consulted, Panacea Adviser has submitted an FCA FOI request as we would like to know more around who or what exactly “extensive industry engagement” represents. We have requested some clarification asking:

Who exactly have the FCA had “extensive industry engagement” with?

What is their level of Social Media knowledge, influence and expertise?

What is the FCA’s understanding of how a financial adviser would use Social Media based upon to produce this proposed guidance?

The FCA has a problem, as it seems to be trying to re-invent the wheel and Highway Code at the same time to control a vehicle that no longer has wheels, or is powered by petrol derivatives and that can, using technology, control and navigate itself quite responsibly indeed.

Some facts for the FCA to digest before they attempt to impose regulation where in many cases a simple application of common sense and a bit of caveat emptor would do the job just as well and at much lower cost.

Businesses building a significant following on social media are in fact creating their own publishing platforms, like us at Panacea, growing their channels of influence and content distribution networks.

They are creating a huge digital asset that grows every year in size and most importantly in value*.

Over time their investment in social media can provide huge opportunities for their clients and marketing independence if done right.

So with that in mind the FCA should have a look at some major social media metrics at the start of 2014.

Social media is simply a “blur of tweets, shares and content”. No longer is it just used by the young and those with little else to do. It is global and embedded in every corner of the web.

And above all, no matter how they may try, it cannot be regulated in the way the FCA would wish.

Some basic facts:

  1. 72% of all internet users are now active on social media
  2. 18-29 year olds have an 89% usage
  3. The 30-49 age group have 72% usage
  4. 60 percent of 50 to 60 year olds are active on social media
  5. In the 65 plus bracket, 43% are using social media
  6. Here are the top 3 countries for time spent on Facebook per hour online:

USA 16 minutes,

Australia 14 minutes

UK at 13 minutes.

  1. Some 71% of users access social media from a mobile device.

Twitter is the fastest growing social networking service seeing 44% growth in 2013, Google+ grew 33% in the same period, Facebook has 1.15bn monthly active users, Twitter 215m and the average time spent online with social media networks is 13 minutes per hour in the UK.

The Internet ethos was not and is not about control and regulation. It is global, operates, 24 hours a day and like the ‘Curates Egg’ is good in parts. It does not react well to phrases like “within our regime” or “standalone compliance”.

Isaac Newton said “I can calculate the motion of heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people”. The regulatory emphasis should be on the appropriateness of advice given, not a 140 character tweet that may have led to that process.

And the FCA wants to control this?

I would suggest they look at an easier and far lower cost opportunity, the banks?

*Information sources:

Google

Wikipedia

Jeffbullas

FCA

How much is that website in the window, the one with the bright shiny logo

 

Andrew Power, partner at Deloitte, was recently on record as saying that increasing regulation and its associated cost will certainly exacerbate the trend that sees advisers dealing with wealthier and wealthier clients as they need a certain weight of assets to get an income flow”. He is also of the view that “there may also be a back-lash against regulation”.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) recently told advisers in the A13 fee block (which covers most adviser firms) that they face an increase in fees for 2013/14 from £32.8m to £37.9m.

We also heard that firms regulated by the FCA would plug the Financial Services Authority (FSA)’s £107m pension deficit under the new regulatory structure.

Concern continues to mount regarding the costs of regulation upon adviser firms, most of whom are small businesses. As an industry, we are told that every effort is being made to ensure that regulatory costs are contained, that ideally budgets will be carefully considered, and that the FCA will exercise care in how it spends the money placed at its disposal by the firms it is empowered to regulate.

So, on seeing the new logo role out on the 1st April, it crossed my mind that perhaps the date was an omen for what is to come, an ‘April Fool’ but one that costs a lot.

To test that theory, we made a Freedom of Information request to the FCA asking:

“I would be most grateful if you can confirm the costs incurred to create and establish the brand identity of the FCA up to its April launch.

This should ideally relate to the creative, design and production costs. In particular we would request details of the cost of the logo design, the website design and build, the rulebook and all stationary costs to facilitate the creation and launch of the FCA in April.”

To put some contextual flesh on the bone, in the view of some well-placed industry experts, “the functionality of the FCA website seems fairly basic”. It is pretty much a re-skin of the FSA site, the rulebook has rolled over too. Some editing would be required, for example changing references from the FSA to the FCA, something that is a simple ‘Word’ function in many ways but on a large scale.

The staffing of the FCA is mostly a transfer from the FSA, the address is the same.

I am very pleased to report that the request was dealt with promptly, politely and we have now received the reply that we are sure will be of interest to the industry as a whole and small adviser firms in particular.

As a new regulatory organisation, the FCA states that it “needs to ensure that consumers, firms, markets and its staff understand its objectives as well as perceive the FCA as a new regulatory body. To this effect, we have developed a new brand identity to reflect our new objectives and how we will engage with consumers and firms differently”. The resulting logo design is clear and simple.

But should the exercise cost £1,061,423 including VAT? At nearly 3% of the 2013/14 adviser fee pot, is this money well spent?

The cost of the logo design:

“We have spent £48,000 on designing the FCA brand identity, £91,500 on developing the FCA brand guidelines, £57,000 on registering the new logo and on legal fees to resolve registration issues”. 

The website design and build:

“The cost of the new FCA website, which included its design, build, architecture, code and content changes was £723,576.81”.

The rulebook:

“We have interpreted ‘rulebook’ as the FCA’s ‘Handbook’.  The total expenditure for this work which involved the design, legal fees, development and build of the new site was £101,000”.

All Stationery costs:

“We spent £40,347.68 on the design and production of business cards, note pads and pens. It is worth noting that stocks of FSA stationery were monitored and run down and replenished with new FCA’s stationery in the lead up to 1 April to minimise costs”.

A spokesperson for the FCA commented: “Several agencies submitted quotes for the work on both the brand identity and website design and in both instances we chose the agency who offered the best value for money. All this was delivered on time and on budget.”

As Mandy Rice Davies said they “would say that wouldn’t they”?

One agency, GASP, did exactly that and said “I find a figure in excess of £700k outrageous. You can achieve a lot with that type of digital spend…the cynic in me has a good idea what has happened here.”

Marketing Director of Panacea Adviser, Sarah Paul, who has over 15 years experience working within e-business and marketing functions for several major financial services firms commented, “For a website with no apparent tools or interactivity, I find it incredible that over £700,000 would be spent on a basic rebrand”.

Simon Ryan of Social Advisers, who has considerable experience at corporate level working on rebranding projects, said “For the extent of the changes that were required for a simple refresh from the FSA to the FCA and looking at what they have delivered, I’m not convinced the FCA will be able to claim they have received value for money. The website costs would raise alarm bells for me”.

The news of this spend comes in the same month that David Geale, the FCA’s head of investment policy commented that “Forcing platforms to justify charges will reduce costs”.

He said “We are concerned that the current way that platforms are funded is opaque and makes it difficult for customers to understand how much they are paying for the platform service or to compare platforms”.

Well, Mr. Geale, I think the industry is having difficulty understanding how much they are paying to be regulated – both in the past by the FSA and now the FCA.

In the world of regulation, a spend of £1.06m is not a lot of money – yet that is precisely the problem. The old adage about the pennies looking after themselves could not be directed at a more deserving target. After all, if this figure can be spent and is, for example, 30% more than it need be, the big question posed is where else too much money is being paid.

Perhaps the Treasury Select Committee (TSC), who has been advised of this spend, should conduct an enquiry into the regulator’s processes regarding infrastructure spending and ensuring value for money by way of quality at the very best price.

The time has come to stop the seemingly profligate spending of other people’s money, consumers’ money, in fact, as they are ultimately the ones who end up paying.

Or, is it the case that as now it is only the wealthy who have easy access to paid-for financial advice, that who pays the piper and how the piper acts really does not matter?

What do you think? Add your comment here.

The person next to me smells

The power of the consumer to distribute the experience after a face to face financial interview or an online journey has never been greater.

An ever increasing number of people will share experiences, positive or negative and instead of talking to their friend at the bus stop, or in the pub with a few mates, these experiences can now be sent round the world via a devastatingly powerful interconnected human network.

Business can be shattered or enjoy fantastic reviews in an instant via a vast connection of social consumerism. People in the UK are happier to share experiences via an online medium because of the ‘veil of secrecy’ that social feedback systems offer them. People will happily facebook or tweet that the ‘person sitting next to them smells’, but would not engage in conversation with that person, and point out that there is a raspberry and kiwi shower gel in Boots that has a Trust Pilot review of 4.6 out of 5.

Through social media and online feedback systems, individuals are motivated to share everyreaction, and Zuckerberg’s law suggests that the number of social objects we share online willdouble every year. The world has changed and people now expect information to come to them and be available in a personalised format. Context is paramount in the business of engagement and the consumer is now in control of how relevant context moves in their direction and influences their next steps.

Facebook and Google are engaging in a battle for market share and supremacy of the online media space. A very similar battle for supremacy ensued in the 90’s between Halifax and Abbey, theylocked horns for a ding dong battle for the greatest percentage market share of the intermediary mortgage business. This battle had the result of giving all of our clients access to excellent interest rates and services. That is, until Abbey had a few difficulties with admin, and we all went to Halifax. It is unlikely there will be an outright winner between Facebook and Google just shifting controls through innovation.

News now finds us, with special offers and deals sent directly to our phones, iPads and laptops all consumers need to do is unlock and activate. Sending these offers and connecting with the consumer is not limited to the comparison sites, however they are the best at it. They leave the banks and insurance companies stuck at first base. However, it is not just attracting the consumer to your site there is the ‘decision making cycle’!

There are considerations that need to be looked at for any online strategy, with the ‘decision making cycle’ divided into 4 key stages.

  1. Formulation: The moment or instance that triggers interest and the steps a consumer takes to reduce the initial options.

  2. Pre-Commerce: Based on the initial consideration, the consumer conducts open research to validate the initial choices.

  3. Commerce: When the decision making process is concluded the consumer journey is only just the beginning. Touch points unlock to shape and steer the ensuing customer experience.

  4. Post- Commerce: Following the purchase, consumers bond with the product, but to what extent defines their loyalty and advocacy. 

Knowing the consumer and understanding their decision-making and experience-sharing behaviour, is instrumental in developing on target engagement and marketing strategies.

It is the consumer that ultimately defines the success of the brand, product or service with a motivation to share every reaction. The difference now is that the consumer is making the world a much smaller place, they may not say directly that the ‘person next to them smells’ but you can guarantee that information is being shared and then shared again, by an interlocking social network.

 

James Sadler
Independent B2C Consultant 

James Sadler works as an independent Online Consultant helping Financial Services Business maximise sales through an Online strategy. 

London woman names daughter ‘Hashtag’

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When I read this I was speechless and frankly this headline taught me that you can never ever predict the strange things people will do.

There are always new ways to innovate, but was this a step too far? It was Bill Gates who said, “The Internet is becoming the town square for the global village of tomorrow”.

In the ’90’s many businesses, and especially those in financial services, didn’t see why they needed a website, or indeed email or mobile phones. Just think, where would your business be now without any one of these?

Social media is exactly the same, not everyone gets why they need it, but eventually everyone will.  The sooner you and your business adapts, the sooner you’ll start to see the results. Social media will help your business flourish in so many ways today and will be an essential tool to the success you no doubt want in the future.

Social media goes from strength to strength. According to Incite’s recent Social Media Report, consumers continue to spend more time on social networks than on any other category of site, roughly 20 percent of their total time is online via PC and interestingly 30 percent of total time online via mobile devices.

Additionally, total time spent on social media in the USA across PCs and mobile devices increased 37 percent to 121 billion minutes in July 2012, compared to 88 billion in July 2011.

The recent proliferation of mobile devices and better, faster connectivity helped fuel the continued growth of social media and in the UK some 5% of UK households now own an Internet connected smart TV.

But social media is less about technology and more about relationship building; we are starting to see more women have a heavy influence, if not dominant role in the social media space. It’s no wonder that Facebook is being run in part by Sheryl Sandberg.

The range and diversity of social networks is also on the up, social media users are rarely tied exclusively to just one social network. Indeed, the interaction between different social sites is immense. Users dart between multiple networks in order to chat to their various groups of friends and associates.

But with financial services, the desire to embrace is countered by the urge to regulate it, and regulation and the Internet are not easy bedfellows. Indeed the Internet treats censorship or control as a ‘malfunction it does not compute’ and navigates around it.

Barrack Obama said recently, the Internet didn’t get invented on its own. Government research created the Internet (a British invention) so that all the companies could make money off the Internet. The point is that when we succeed, we succeed not only because of our individual initiatives, but also because we do things together”.

So why is financial services slower than most to engage?

Well, it could be an age thing, with so many within the adviser community being 60 or more, but I think it runs deeper than that. It is a simple fear of trying to understanding how, what, where, when and importantly the “is it compliant” impact upon the ease for them to engage.

Providers are very concerned that by engaging with social media it will open the floodgates for a tsunami of negative comments that they cannot control thus creating brand damage.

People and businesses care most about what their peers think and the technology is there for information, good and bad, true or false, to be quickly shared on products and services.

Getting information off the Internet is like taking a drink from a fire hydrant on full flow.

But by engaging with that social media flow, influence can move both ways. Because you or your business do not have a presence on Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook does not mean anything bad or negative will be said about you. By being there at least you can put the record straight and to the same audience.

Google’s Chairman Eric Schmidt said, “The Internet is the first thing that humanity has built that humanity doesn’t understand, the largest experiment in anarchy that we have ever had”.

The FSA was not too keen on the use of social media or indeed anarchy and that is because it cannot control either. The guides that came from Canary Wharf about the consumer detriment 140 characters can cause is not grasping an understanding at all of the fact that increasingly, consumers don’t search for products and services, rather services come to their attention via social media, warts and all.

The FCA seems to be adopting a more considered position, Martin Wheatley, clarified the regulator’s intentions to make better use of Twitter in an interview with the Daily Mail in the days leading up to the transfer of power from the Financial Services Authority.

The Internet is now way beyond just making money. It is about brand awareness, reputation, creation, influence, opinion seeking or forming and much more.

But not definitely not control and certainly not by regulation.

To assist in creating a better understanding within our community, we just launched our Panacea Social Stream service.

It provides a great service that gets around all the problems so many advisers have about time constraints regarding how, what, where, when and importantly the “is it compliant” impact upon the ease to engage.

It will help you to develop your business in this field, engage with you clients and get the most from social media. This resource will grow richer each month, adding to the 70,000 plus site pages with new ideas and of course opportunities.

The power of social media is that it forces necessary change, any regulator, any adviser and any consumer, should see that as a very big and positive outcome.

It’s about the “Money, money, money”

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How to build a super-profitable advisory firm

We recently noticed some very interesting tweets on “How to build a super-profitable advisory firm” and after reading and digesting them we felt it was worth a conversation with the “Tweet” source- a forward thinking accountancy firm, the WOW Company.

As accountants, they’ve worked with hundreds of small businesses over the years, from start-up to £5m turnover and with this in mind we asked them to share their thoughts and experiences with the community, we are sure you will find this an interesting and informative read.

Enjoy.

“We’re constantly fascinated by the difference between those that make it big and those that just tick along, so we thought we’d find out what separates these two groups and share with you the things you need to be thinking about if you’re serious about building a super-profitable advisory firm.

Get cash in quicker

Some quick tips to get your cash in quicker (particularly relevant post RDR):

  • Ask for deposits – Do not start work on a project until you have been paid a deposit. If the client is not willing to work in this way, walk away. They will only be a nightmare further down the line.
  • Staged payments – Don’t leave a massive payment to be made at the end, split the project up into its key milestones and look to invoice regularly throughout.
  • Reduce your payment terms to ‘by return’ – If you give 30 days credit, you cannot start asking for the money for 30 days. This is crazy – it is the banks that should be lending to businesses right now, not you! Change your payment terms on invoices to ‘by return’ and you’re then able to ask for the money sooner.
  • Be upfront – State your terms in your ‘terms of engagement’ document. It won’t stop clients trying to negotiate, but at least you can start the discussion on your terms, not theirs.
  • Retain leverage – Don’t e-mail over the final report or complete the pension transfer until they have paid for it. Once the project is completed, you’ve got no leverage.
  • Have a system for getting cash in – Review your debtors at least once a week and allocate time to make phone calls to get the cash in. If you’re not comfortable doing it, find someone that is.

Really get to grips with the numbers

Unless you really understand the important numbers in your business, you’ve got no chance of increasing your profit. And we’re not just talking about understanding your accounts here. There are everyday numbers within your business that will be crucial guides to how you are doing. We help our clients set up dashboards for their businesses, to ensure you are regularly reviewing the numbers that are important to you.

Every business is different, so we’re offering 30-minute telephone reviews for any small business who needs help setting up their dashboard. Get in touch if you’d like to arrange this (no charge for this initial chat).

Prioritise sales & marketing

We’re Accountants, so we’re not going to start dispensing marketing advice. However, when we did our research, we noticed that the clients that make the most profit mentioned that a key turning point for them in their growth journey was when they decided to prioritise sales and marketing. We spotted a number of common traits amongst the top performing advisory firms. They all had the following:

  • An individual responsible for sales and marketing (it didn’t fall in between 2 directors).
  • Allocated time to complete sales activity, e.g. every Tuesday & Thursday, or the first 2 hours of each day.
  • Targets for generating opportunities, e.g. number of meetings required per week.
  • Kept track of the key stats, e.g. where the client heard about them, number of meetings, value of assignment, conversion rate, final project value.
  • A plan – Not ‘War & Peace’, but a simple one page plan that showed them what they were going to do this month to generate clients.

Do you prioritise sales and marketing in your business?

Make your projects more profitable

It’s one of the biggest challenges that advisory firms face: Delivering great client service, whilst still making a profit. We see so many firms walking the tightrope between keeping the client happy and ensuring that the scope of the job doesn’t creep beyond the original boundaries – how many times have you said yes to the question “Can you also help me with this?” but then not charged for this additional help? The reality is that there is no simple answer to solving this challenge, but there are lots of little things that you can do to help you achieve more profitable assignments.

Much will depend on how you are doing things at the moment, so get in touch to discuss how you can create more profitable projects. We’ll happily spend 30 minutes on the phone chatting through a few ideas that we have up our sleeve.

Get out of the day-to-day

This is easier said than done, but unless you step away from the coal face, you’ve got no chance of generating sustainable profits. We noticed that the top performing clients we surveyed were masters at delegating and building teams around them that could do the work. The founders were brave when it came to recruiting (they did it early) and were constantly looking ahead to help plan what resource they’d need, including investing early in apprentice paraplanners and training them up for the future.

If you feel that you’ve not got the right team around you to delegate to, then you need to do something about it…. and fast. You’re also going to have to get really good at letting go of the day-to-day tasks, to allow you to concentrate on the bigger picture.

If you’d like to build a super-profitable advisory firm and are looking for an accountant to help you get there, get in touch via info@thewowcompany.com

Peter Czapp;  thewowcompany.com

 

 

Countdown to Panacea Adviser’s new Social Media Services

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Where would your business be today without a website, email or mobile phone?  Social media is growing in the same way as these communication methods did, not everyone gets why they need it, but eventually everyone will.  The sooner you adapt the sooner you’ll start to see the results.

The Panacea Social Stream is a subscription-based service launching on Wednesday 10th April 2013.

A service that provides your firm with compliance-approved content, active social media knowledge and strategy,

A service designed to trigger a response from clients, increase website visits and generate more selling opportunities.

Why use the Panacea Social Stream?

Financial advisers that create content for social media successfully have created better client relationships and more sales opportunities.

Social media is generally not embarked upon for the following reasons:

  • It’s too complicated – I don’t understand social media
  • I don’t know where to start
  • I have Compliance constraints
  • I don’t have the time
  • I don’t know what to write
  • I don’t have anyone to help me with this

The Panacea Social stream can overcome all of these excuses through training, education, strategy and content to enable YOU to actively engage with clients and potential clients with a regular communication stream, consistent updates and relevant news.

If you want to know more about the Panacea Social Stream as soon as it has launched, please complete your details by going to www.panaceaadviser.com/socialstream